In the Valley of Dying Stars

Pianist Benjamin Powell performs a programme of classical music by candlelight. 27 no. 2 'Moonlight' Debussy - Suite Bergamasque Debussy - L'isle Joyeuse Since winning the British Contemporary Piano Competition in Benjamin.

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Adrienne K.

Journal articles

Rose explores the challenges of beginning a translation journal which will address the philosophies, difficulties, and necessity for diversity within the area of classical translation. Early Latin translators, including Cicero De optimo genere oratorum iv. The latter type of translation prioritizes senses, aesthetics, and rhetorical verve. However, language pedagogy in Classics departments emphasize the first type of translation, word for word, and often stop short of encouraging more literary pursuits. In fact, creative translations that deviate from translationese a kind of literal, affected translation style from which the reader may deduce the exact parsing of the original word is actively discouraged.

An upper level student of Latin or Greek has only a few available resources at hand for searching out translations of classical authors whom they may be reading for a language class.


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Students use them to figure out and then accentuate their ability to parse the word. Once students achieve advanced levels of reading proficiency, they are expected to read from the original texts, overlooking any literary translations and, consequently, the rich educational and interpretive value they offer. These are the translation tools I used as crutches as an undergraduate Classics major almost twenty years ago.

I and others have written about the benefits of incorporating more literary translations into our classrooms.

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Major publishing houses, like Norton and Penguin and Hackett, release several full-length volumes of new or reprinted translations by established scholars each year. Poets and writers publishing literary translations of Classical works in book form are easily searchable and benefit from publishing house publicity. Typically these translations are made by established writers with a long history of scholarship or literary work in their credentials. Newer voices, particularly the voices of women and minority translators, as well as voices enlisting unconventional translation strategies, are more difficult to locate.

Classicists and translators Johanna Hanink here and here , Jinyu Liu , and Diane Rayor have also written about the value of expanding the purview of translation in the Classics. A literary translator of ancient Classical texts encounters challenges distinct from those that modern translators face: historical contexts and figures far remote from our present moment, social customs, idiosyncratic cultural references , fragmentary texts, lacunae, emendations, hapaxes, and the absence of author input and collaboration, to name a few.

With canonical authors and texts, the sheer number of translations already published in English can also be difficult to address.


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  • In Classics, most translation is a retranslation not the first translation, but often a second or third, etc. Figure 2: Muse reading a scroll Attic red-figure lekythos, ca. The nuances and challenges of translation compelled me, together with the help of colleagues and a number of graduate students at the University of Iowa, to form a new journal focused inclusively on publishing Classical translators. We are planning to launch the first issue of Ancient eXchanges title yet to be finalized , which will be an online journal devoted to literary translations of ancient texts.

    In setting out on this new endeavor, we have begun to rectify some of the mistakes of the past by envisioning this journal as one with a chronological orientation but global perspective. We aim to broaden the traditional partitioning of the ancient world along narrow geographical lines.

    The journal encourages translations of Classical texts that prioritize the literary over the literal: translations that are contemporary and poetic, rhetorically arresting, aesthetically delightful, creative, adaptive, transformative, innovative, experimental, and multi-modal.

    We also hope to change the way translations are deployed and used in the Classics classroom. However, language pedagogy in Classics departments emphasize the first type of translation, word for word, and often stop short of encouraging more literary pursuits. In fact, creative translations that deviate from translationese a kind of literal, affected translation style from which the reader may deduce the exact parsing of the original word is actively discouraged. An upper level student of Latin or Greek has only a few available resources at hand for searching out translations of classical authors whom they may be reading for a language class.

    Students use them to figure out and then accentuate their ability to parse the word.

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    Once students achieve advanced levels of reading proficiency, they are expected to read from the original texts, overlooking any literary translations and, consequently, the rich educational and interpretive value they offer. These are the translation tools I used as crutches as an undergraduate Classics major almost twenty years ago. I and others have written about the benefits of incorporating more literary translations into our classrooms.

    Major publishing houses, like Norton and Penguin and Hackett, release several full-length volumes of new or reprinted translations by established scholars each year. Poets and writers publishing literary translations of Classical works in book form are easily searchable and benefit from publishing house publicity.

    Typically these translations are made by established writers with a long history of scholarship or literary work in their credentials. Newer voices, particularly the voices of women and minority translators, as well as voices enlisting unconventional translation strategies, are more difficult to locate.

    Select Publications by Dr Adrienne Lee Withall | UNSW Research

    Classicists and translators Johanna Hanink here and here , Jinyu Liu , and Diane Rayor have also written about the value of expanding the purview of translation in the Classics. A literary translator of ancient Classical texts encounters challenges distinct from those that modern translators face: historical contexts and figures far remote from our present moment, social customs, idiosyncratic cultural references , fragmentary texts, lacunae, emendations, hapaxes, and the absence of author input and collaboration, to name a few.

    With canonical authors and texts, the sheer number of translations already published in English can also be difficult to address. In Classics, most translation is a retranslation not the first translation, but often a second or third, etc. Figure 2: Muse reading a scroll Attic red-figure lekythos, ca. The nuances and challenges of translation compelled me, together with the help of colleagues and a number of graduate students at the University of Iowa, to form a new journal focused inclusively on publishing Classical translators.

    We are planning to launch the first issue of Ancient eXchanges title yet to be finalized , which will be an online journal devoted to literary translations of ancient texts. In setting out on this new endeavor, we have begun to rectify some of the mistakes of the past by envisioning this journal as one with a chronological orientation but global perspective. We aim to broaden the traditional partitioning of the ancient world along narrow geographical lines.

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    The journal encourages translations of Classical texts that prioritize the literary over the literal: translations that are contemporary and poetic, rhetorically arresting, aesthetically delightful, creative, adaptive, transformative, innovative, experimental, and multi-modal. We also hope to change the way translations are deployed and used in the Classics classroom. Stay tuned for an official announcement in the new year. Submissions will be accepted in early Her book manuscript The Perfect Translation: once more, with feeling is focused on reception and retranslation of ancient Mediterranean and East Asian lyric by Anglo-American poets and artists such as Anne Carson, Brandon Brown, and the 85 Project.

    In Spring , she is co-organizing an international colloquium on "Reading and Retranslation.

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